Industry Updates

Changes

bowie-change
courtesy securosis.com

New year, new you…that’s what they always say, right? Just a few weeks into 2018, it seems like some of the big 4 ISPs (soon to be Big 3?) are really taking that concept to heart.

Microsoft’s major migration of Outlook.com to the Office365 backend was technically completed in 2017, but based on feedback from senders in industry groups delivery issues still abound. The indications from MS are that the mail handling and filtering infrastructure are a work in progress, but no formal statement has been issued to that end. Some senders have stated MS support is unable to provide remediation for many of these issues, even though there may be backend adjustments taking place. If you’re having trouble getting mail to Microsoft, just know you’re not alone and that someone over there is paying attention.

Verizon ended its own webmail service last year, and consolidated its AOL and Yahoo brands under the Oath moniker. AOL and Yahoo’s email services have remained separate thus far, but indications are that will change in the next few days. It’s been reported that the merger of these mail platforms starts in earnest on or around February 1st. As of that date, mail to AOL will be routed and handled by the Yahoo mail servers. To me this sounds a bit like the SBCGlobal arrangement between AT&T/BellSouth and Yahoo, wherein one provided the mail interface while the other handled the mail routing and filtering. At this time, no formal announcement has been made, so we’ll have to sit tight to find out exactly what this means for sending to AOL recipients.

– BG

Industry Updates

Verizon email is gone, but when?

verizonThere’s been a lot of industry buzz recently around Verizon’s announcement they are in the process of shutting down their email business. Most in the email industry knew this was coming, but with no solid details the ‘when’ remained a bit fuzzy. Even now, the official FAQs don’t provide a concrete timetable for the shutdown, and it seems likely it will happen in phases.

According to MediaPost, Verizon account holders have been receiving email notifications informing them of a 30-day deadline to take action. These actions include choosing to keep their verizon.net address (serviced by AOL going forward) or migrating to another service provider altogether. If no action is taken during that 30 days, the customer loses access to the account and all associated services.

Once account access is terminated, the email account is subject to Verizon’s typical account deletion timeline of 180 days of inactivity. The FAQs don’t specify, however, if the 6-month countdown starts from the most recent login or from the end of the 30-day window when access is terminated.

Verizon spokesman Raymond McConville estimates that, of its 4.5 million total accounts, 2.3 million have been active within the past 30 days – though that’s no guarantee they’ll take action on the shutdown notice.

What does that mean for senders? Sometime within the next 6 months you’re likely to see a large portion of your verizon.net subscriber addresses disappear as over 2 million Verizon email accounts are deleted. Most senders don’t have a huge component of verizon.net addresses, but it’s certainly a good idea to check now so you’re not taken by surprise by an abnormal bounce rate.

– BG